The Washington Post
December 13, 2016

More than 33,000 people died of opioid overdoses in the United States last year.But speaking of an “opiate epidemic” is in some ways a misnomer. The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that the country is in fact dealing with multiple opioid epidemics right now — each with a distinct geographic footprint.

[su_button url=”https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/12/13/where-opiates-killed-the-most-people-in-2015/?_hsenc=p2ANqtz-93FNxJbVipBLpaN2ftO9I5nsMA-ebqRco-o_DhedkwPYrNOaHWk9XszjETBWrKkUTZkIdek9DoJNlNNs7Hv_LOkwtA0AELLCDp0Xxq_c5OiuOGCQs&_hsmi=39235647&utm_campaign=KHN%3A%20First%20Edition&utm_content=39235647&utm_medium=email&utm_source=hs_email&utm_term=.c47a9234277d” target=”blank” style=”flat” background=”#0a3853″ center=”yes” icon=”icon: adjust” icon_color=”#ffffff” desc=”Where Opiates Killed the Most People in 2015″]Click to see maps and read more[/su_button]

2017-01-05T11:09:44+00:00